JOURNALISM APPRENTICESHIP: Editors, NCTJ to develop higher on-the-job journalist training

Britain‘s National Council for the Training of Journalists (NCTJ) reports that it is currently working with journalism employers from several newspapers and TV channels to develop a programme of higher apprenticeships for journalists to acquire news-writing skills on the job. Their plans were formally announced in a news release published on the council’s website this past Thursday (23 October 2014). The NCTJ along with selected employers had recently pitched their idea of a higher apprenticeship to the British government. Ministers there have now given the new qualification system the green light of approval in their efforts to tackle rising youth unemployment in the country.

A group of journalism representatives from a variety of national and regional media organisations including Archant, the BBC; BSkyB; i; The IndependentIndependent on SundayJohnston Press; the KM GroupLondon Evening Standard; the Mark Allen Group; Newsquest; MNA Media and the Telegraph Media Group, jointly submitted an application to Whitehall which has been approved as part of the Conservative-Liberal Democrat coalition‘s ‘phase three’ trailblazer apprenticeship scheme to help unemployed and undecided youngsters obtain valuable skills that will prepare them for future careers in the media. Traditionally, British journalists were taken on as junior reporters after completing their formal education. They received on-the-job training from senior news workers and editors, but in the past fifteen years an increasing emphasis by the U.K. jobs market on university qualifications universally has seen the journalism apprenticeships of several decades ago become almost obsolete. Newer cohorts of media hopefuls tend to be university graduates who pick up training via often unpaid or expenses only work experience. Media organisations have lately been criticised for not being inclusive enough in their intake of new employees and several major news providers have reinstated internships and apprentice training courses to attract new recruits from less well-represented sections of society.

The trailblazer scheme aims to give employers more say and freedom to develop apprenticeship standards in their industry which will help deliver the practical skills needed by vocational trainees for a particular business sector.

The new journalism apprenticeship was announced the day Skills Minister Nick Boles visited the offices of international media outlet Sky, home of Sky News and Sky Television, to meet with Bella Vuillermoz, director of their training school, the Sky Academy, to discuss training opportunities for young and new journalists moving into the career away from the university pathway favoured by most recruiters in the current media environment. Boles also conversed with Nicola Hart, Sky’s head of future talent; Andy Cairns, its executive editor, and Laurie Tucker, head of training at Sky Sports News; and Joanne Butcher, chief executive of the NCTJ, who is co-ordinating the industry’s apprenticeship trailblazer projects.

In a discussion on the government’s trailblazer scheme and its wider changes to the national apprenticeship and employment programme, the NCTJ chief executive lauded the improvements to the initiative, saying that the old system had now been made more streamlined and simplified and that she was encouraged to see  greater responsibility and autonomy allocated to employers and the NCTJ in attracting more learners to the UK media industry’s training courses. She did however criticise the ongoing reliance on jargon within the programme, which may put off potential apprentices from signing up. Meanwhile, Sky’s head of training apparently joked that at a recent meeting he had struggled with the shorthand outline for ‘synoptic assessment’. Boles also had the opportunity to meet Britain’s first journalism apprentice undergoing training thanks to the trailblazer scheme, James Kilpatrick. Kilpatrick is now interning at Sky Sports News and is one of 18 apprentices on the second NCTJ apprenticeship day release course at Lambeth College in south London. James will experience all aspects of the Sky Sports News operation, starting with the digital media team, with an aim to give him and his fellow apprentices a well-rounded experience of the day-to-day life as a Sky journalist.

The higher apprenticeship by the NCTJ is following in the path of an existing standard for junior apprenticeships in journalism set up by the council in league with employers. This standard, although complete, will not come into force in England until 2015. It will be an update of the current apprenticeship qualification offered by the NCTJ to trainee reporters who wish to forego the usual graduation route. The proposed senior journalist apprenticeship will also now be written to an industry standard to be decided by the NCTJ with consultations from the media industry expected to commence  in the New Year.

Chairman of the journalism apprenticeship group, David Rowell said: “This is an exciting new development in our apprenticeship training scheme and will provide an opportunity for school leavers to progress to more senior roles.

Skills minister Nick Boles said: “I congratulate the journalism employers for the key role they are playing in developing new top-quality apprenticeships. Through the trailblazers initiative companies, in collaboration with their industry partners, will give people the skills they need to thrive and our businesses need to compete.

The full guidance document for the British government’s phase three of the trailblazer scheme for apprentices can be viewed here.

Several media organisations in the United Kingdom already run their own training programmes and apprenticeships for students, including the BBC, Sky and ITV, offering training with actual journalists in fields such as broadcasting, public relations, digital/new media and radio. The BBC’s Academy of Journalism attracts thousands of applications from would-be trainees every year, with only a small number successfully securing places. The NCTJ, which is the official body for journalism training in the U.K., offers its own qualifications and accreditations which are highly respected and sought after by journalism employers. The council currently offers a Level 3 Advanced Apprenticeship in Journalism enabling students to combine learning at sixth-form college or further education institutions with on-the-job training. It has been supported by media industry leaders for opening doors to a competitive industry for local young people as well as those who come from ethnic minority backgrounds.

SOURCES:
“Useful Sites” – Vijay Shah, The Half-Eaten Mind https://halfeatenmind.wordpress.com/useful-sites/
“Government accepts proposal to develop higher-level journalism apprenticeship” – National Council for the Training of Journalists (23 October 2014) http://www.nctj.com/latestnews/Governmentacceptsproposaltodevelophigher-leveljournalismapprenticeship
“Apprenticeships” – National Council for the Training of Journalists http://www.nctj.com/journalism-qualifications/apprenticeships
IMAGE CREDIT:
Getty Images via Zemanta.
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11 thoughts on “JOURNALISM APPRENTICESHIP: Editors, NCTJ to develop higher on-the-job journalist training

  1. Aquileana October 26, 2014 / 6:37 am

    Truly interesting post, Vijay, Happy sunday and week ahead to you, Aquileana 😛

    Like

  2. jacquiegum October 27, 2014 / 11:03 pm

    This was interesting! No idea how it compares to apprenticeships here in the US?

    Like

    • halfeatenmind November 1, 2014 / 4:37 pm

      Thanks Jacquie…I have no idea how it works in the US, but I’m aware that many local newspapers in America are keen to take on interns and many US journalists begin their career via this route.

      Vijay

      Like

  3. lenie5860 October 28, 2014 / 11:31 am

    If one thing has come out of the Global recession is that Governments and Business have become more creative in finding solutions to the young, educated unemployed. This is one example.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Marquita Herald (@marquitaherald) October 28, 2014 / 4:45 pm

    This is my first visit to your site – love the title! This is a terrific story and program, in fact I wish apprentice programs were far more common. Thanks!

    Like

  5. Ken Dowell October 28, 2014 / 8:03 pm

    Hopefully this program proves to be a success and is expanded. In the U.S. I sense there has been a decline in interest in journalism to go along with the decline in the nunber of journalist jobs and the salaries that are paid. But journalism education or training has value that goes far beyond entry level jobs. Knowing how to ask the right questions. how to research issues and how to write succinct and interesting copy are skills that will help you in almost any profession.

    Like

    • halfeatenmind November 1, 2014 / 4:55 pm

      An excellent comment, Ken.
      Journalism indeed has many useful and transferable skills, and is also a good place to develop soft (interpersonal) skills alongside the harder stuff.

      Vijay

      Like

  6. andleeb October 28, 2014 / 9:38 pm

    It is such a great idea by which many of youngsters will be benefited. They will not only get news-writing skills on the job , but also will make a strong network that can help them getting a job in future.

    Liked by 1 person

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