NATHAN’S PIES AND EELS: Legendary East London cafe to close after 80 years

London – VIJAY SHAH and TOM HORTON via Newham Recorder

East London is to lose another long-time landmark after a business that specialises in selling the area’s traditional delicacy of jellied eels alongside hot football match snacks announced it would be calling time after eighty years in business, according to a report by the local newspaper, the Newham Recorder.

 

Nathan’s Pies and Eels, based in Barking Road, Upton Park, near the former Boleyn Stadium of the football club West Ham United, is a ‘pie and mash’ shop, a restaurant selling traditional London food such as steak and kidney pies and mashed potato It has been run by the Nathan family since it first opened eighty years ago, with forty of those years spent at the same Barking Road site. The shop was very popular with football fans travelling in to watch West Ham play, with its traditional East London fare a highly sought after introduction to local cuisine.

The shop was opened by the great-grandfather of current owner Richard Nathan. However, since West Ham United moved to the former Olympic Stadium in nearby Stratford in 2016, Nathan’s steadily lost business and, in addition to many of its staff nearing retirement age, forcing the shop to reconsider its future. Richard plans to keep it business as usual until the 26th of May this year when Nathan’s will serve its last pie. In its heyday, the small shop was frequented by even the giants of the West Ham locker room, such as Rio Ferdinand and Julian Dicks, during the glory days of the 1990s and 2000s

Speaking with the Newham Recorder, Nathan said the closure of the café would be a ‘sad day’ for the Nathan family, the shop staff and fans of it’s hunger-busting pies and mash, and that the closure was ‘the end of an era’.

“It’s a bit cheesy, but we are like a big family”, Nathan said of his close-knit staff, many of whom have worked at the café for years.

The owner of Nathan’s Pies and Eels himself plans to retrain as a handyman after the shop ceases trading in less than two weeks, the Recorder said. The café has been inundated with condolences and cards from well-wishers.

SOURCES:

Newham Recorder, Facebook, Facebook Inc. https://www.facebook.com/Newham.Recorder/

“Iconic family-run Upton Park pie and mash shop to close after 80 years in business” – Tom Horton, Newham Recorder/Archant (10 May 2018) http://www.newhamrecorder.co.uk/news/iconic-family-run-upton-park-pie-and-mash-shop-to-close-after-80-years-in-business-1-5513152

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MANOR PARK SURGERY: Failing Newham medical centre shuttered by CQC

London – VIJAY SHAH via ALEX SHAW and Newham Recorder

A poorly performing doctor’s surgery in the London Borough of Newham’s Manor Park area, east London, was ordered to close down after an inspection by the Care Quality Commission (CQC) ruled it as inadequate, reported local newspaper Newham Recorder.

The Manor Park Medical Centre, in Romford Road, was responsible for 1,300 local patients. It’s closure came after it failed three inspection reports in a row, the last one carried out in July 2017, the Newham Recorder stated. The CQC, which ensures standards of medical facilities in the UK, was scathing in its appraisal of the Manor Park Medical Centre, rating it as ‘inadequate’ in five key areas. A notice was pinned to the surgery’s house-like varnished wooden door announcing its closure, and offering a map and address of an alternative medical facility in nearby Church Road. The notice was issued by the Newham NHS Clinical Commissioning Group.

 

The Medical Centre, headed by Dr Surendra Kumar Dhariwal, appealed against the closure decision, but the CQC and a court at a first-tier tribunal had the upper hand. The centre’s registration was terminated this past Monday, which meant the practice no longer is open to patients.

“I was very concerned about patient care at Dr Surendra Kumar Dhariwal’s practice and the lack of response or improvement we have witnessed since previous inspections,” said Prof Ursula Gallagher, CQC deputy chief inspector of GP practices.

The regulator was “left with no option” but to close the practice “in the interests of patients,” she added.

The Medical Centre had been running into trouble since November 2016, and later inspections revealed no improvement in the situation. CQC inspectors were shocked by the poor levels of staff appraisal and training, unclear staffing arrangements and there were noticeable gaps in background checking of new staff.

The inspectors also raised concerns about the physical state of the centre and its medicine stocks. The Newham Recorder stated that the premises were covered in dust and some pharmaceutical items were also dusty or expired.

A significant amount of medicines and equipment were not fit for use and there were no effective systems in place to address this,” read the report.

It stated there was “no evidence” of the duty of candour, the legal duty of health centres to inform and apologise to patients if mistakes in their care have led to harm.

Dr Dhaliwal was not available for comment at the time of the Recorder’s report, but previously he claimed that improvements were made to the Manor Park Medical Centre after the earlier inspections and it was a “really good practice”. He had been a member of medical staff at the centre for fifty years. The CQC said that the failings at the centre posed a great risk of harm to its patients. It is not known if or when the centre may reopen.

SOURCES:

Newham Recorder, Facebook, Facebook Inc. https://www.facebook.com/Newham.Recorder/

“Three strikes and out for Manor Park GP surgery” – Alex Shaw, Newham Recorder/Archant (6 October 2017) http://www.newhamrecorder.co.uk/news/health/three-strikes-and-out-for-manor-park-gp-surgery-1-5225987

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DBIS SCALEDOWN: UK Government department to shut Sheffield office, others

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Sheffield, UNITED KINGDOM
VIJAY SHAH via The Mirror

The Department for Business Innovation and Skills, a government agency tasked with supporting business development and work initiatives in the United Kingdom, has announced this past Thursday it will be closing down its office in the northern English city of Sheffield and moving jobs to London, the Mirror reports.

The closure is due to go into effect by 2018, possibly seeing the loss of 250 jobs at the Sheffield office, and several other DBIS offices may also face the axe as the Department cuts back under the government’s cost-saving austerity programme and as DBIS leaders look to centralise their operations in the UK’s capital.

Often dubbed the ‘Northern Powerhouse’ for its efforts to promote business in the North of England, the DBIS may close another 12 or so offices, including six in the North, despite previous parliamentary intentions to encourage more investment and job creation in the region, which is one of the poorest pasts of the country, having lost many of its heavy industry output since the 1980s.

The DBIS plans have not been warmly received in Sheffield, a city of 563,749 inhabitants in South Yorkshire, once famed for its stainless steel cutlery manufacturing, but having experienced severe decline until recently. Local MP (Member of ParliamentNick Clegg , former party leader for the Liberal Democrats, told the Mirror: “This flies directly in the face of the Northern Powerhouse agenda.”

“I want to be clear that no one ever put this to me in Government and I would not have agreed to it if they had.”

Labour’s Shadow Civil Service Minister Louise Haigh also lambasted the ruling Conservative party’s decision to close the Sheffield and other northern offices, saying that the plan “demonstrates the utter contempt the Tories have for the North.”

DBIS civil servants have allegedly already been informed of the closure, scheduled for January 2018, with the department looking to move towards a “smaller workforce and more streamlined structures”, according to the Mirror. A spokesperson for UK prime minister David Cameron said “The Business Department, like all departments, seeks to operate as efficiently as it possibly can to deliver the best quality of service to provide the right kind of guidance and advice to ministers.

“This is part of their process of becoming leaner and more efficient.”

The DBIS plans to close its regional offices and focus on fortifying operations at its central HQ in London, where most government departments are situated. Currently the department oversees twelve other regional centres in the towns and cities of Billingham, Birmingham, Bristol, Cambridge, Cardiff, Darlington, Guildford, Gateshead, Leeds, Manchester, Nottingham and Watford – all of which are likely to go with much job losses or relocations.

The DBS will possibly replace them with six ‘business centres’ and some staff will be offered the chance to relocate to them. Each of the new business centres will be connected to a particular business activity, for example higher education, but there will not be one in Sheffield, a huge blow to the city’s economy and business community.

Sheffield Central MP Paul Blomfield said: “Sheffield needs jobs and London’s overheating. This move makes no sense and it exposes George Osborne’s empty rhetoric about the Northern Powerhouse once again.

“I’ve pressed Ministers to move public sector jobs out of London, as Labour did, and I’ll be challenging this decision at every opportunity.

“Well paid civil service jobs provide opportunities for local people. They enable graduates of our two universities to stay in the city.

“Their spending in the local economy creates more jobs. And we need more of the country’s top decision makers to experience life in the regions, not see everything through the distorted experience of London.”

Speaking to Sheffield-based civil servants this morning, the DBIS permanent secretary Martin Donnelly said: “Today’s announcement is part of implementing our BIS 2020 strategic plans to modernise the way we work, reduce operating costs and deliver a simpler, smaller department that is more flexible and responsive to stakeholders and businesses.

“Our operating model needs to be designed in a way that works for this smaller workforce with more streamlined structures.”

“The decision to close Sheffield by 2018 has not been taken lightly. The unions are being consulted and will be involved throughout the process.

“It is my top priority that all our staff are fully briefed and consulted on the process. We will provide comprehensive support to all those facing a potential change or loss of job.

“In relation to the new business centres, we will be working closely with our Partner Bodies over the coming months to develop firm plans for their office locations.”

The DBIS is a relatively new government department, created in 2009  by the merger of the Department for Innovation, Universities and Skills (DIUS) and the Department for Business, Enterprise and Regulatory Reform (BERR). It is headed by Conservative MP Sajid Javid who is also the president of the Board of Trade. The department is responsible for many aspects of business matters, law and education, along with the promotion of trades, scientific research and skills. The DBIS even has remit for business aspects concerning outer space and the postal services. Most deicisions on important policy areas are undertaken at DBIS HQ in Westminster, London.

SOURCES:
Facebook, Facebook Inc. https://www.facebook.com/topic/Department-for-Business-Innovation-and-Skills/133294340042912?source=whfrt&position=1&trqid=6245539918854066441
“‘Northern Powerhouse’ department to close Sheffield office and move 247 jobs to London” – Ben Glaze & Mikey Smith, Mirror/Mirror Online/MGN Limited (28 January 2016) http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/uk-news/northern-powerhouse-department-close-sheffield-7265022
“Sheffield” – Wikipedia/Wikimedia Foundation, Inc. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sheffield
“Department for Business, Innovation and Skills” – Wikipedia/Wikimedia Foundation, Inc. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Department_for_Business,_Innovation_and_Skills
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