LOOKING GOOD?: UK pre-teens increasingly concerned with appearance

London, UNITED KINGDOM
VIJAY SHAH via SWNS digital

 

Increasing numbers of the United Kingdom’s pre-teens, children under thirteen years of age, are becoming concerned over their physical appearances, with the average child now worrying about how they look for ninety minutes a day, according to a study.

An astonishing 90 per cent of the study participants – sourced from different age groups – said they frequently worried about they look, as influences from media, society, picture-perfect celebrities, and the direct and indirect influences of more ‘popular’ classmates impinge on children’s body confidence at startling younger ages.

 

 

One in five surveyed teenagers claimed that they pretended to be ill in order to miss school or work due to low levels of self-confidence stemming from their appearance. The body shame even lasts into adulthood, as 86 per cent of the study’s older participants said they spend an average of one hour and thirteen minutes per day obsessing with what they see in their mirrors. The study found that most teenagers were worried about acne and ‘bad skin’, whereas adults were more concerned with weight. Both age groups were worried equally about bad hair, overall body shape and physique, along with the appearance of their stomachs. Lifestyle magazines for both men and women often devote large numbers of pages to achieving the perfect toned or flab-free stomach and chest.

Skin conditions tend to be the gripe of many people, the study found. Sixty-nine per cent of adults have been afflicted by common skin conditions such as acne, eczema, and conditions causing spots and similar. Ninety-one per cent of them had experienced breakouts of acne even in their post-teenage years.

More disturbingly, it was found that social media is increasingly harming people’s body positivity, with 71 per cent of teenagers and 53 per cent of adults feeling uncomfortable around the sharing of selfies and group photos of themselves on social media sites. Thirty-two per cent of teenagers have used filters and apps to perform virtual plastic surgery on their photos before releasing them to social media, and another 37 per cent have tried to excuse themselves from being photographed.

Outside of social media and the web, the study said that 30 per cent of adults have skipped social events due to fears about how they looked, with 17 per cent resorting to excessive amounts of make-up, 31 per cent covering up their figures with baggy clothing. Four per cent even cancelled dates over their lack of confidence in their looks

The research study was commissioned by the skincare brand Proactiv+, which surveyed 1,000 adults and 1,000 children via online survey service OnePoll. A  company spokesperson told SWNS digital: Almost everyone has concerns about their appearance at one time or another, but it’s staggering to see how young these concerns start.

“And it appears that this is a problem which doesn’t go away with age – the worries we have just change slightly instead.

“Teenagers have a lot to adjust to with puberty, a testing time at school as they approach exams and dealing with peer pressure, so the spot breakouts and acne can really affect their confidence.

“But for many these worries will also continue into adulthood leaving people really struggling with their self-esteem – especially as spots and acne are something most people only associate with the teenage years.”

 

SOURCE/IMAGE CREDIT:
“Pre-Teens Worry about their Appearance for More than 90 Minutes a Day” – SWNS digital/72Point (9 April 2017) http://www.swnsdigital.com/2017/04/pre-teens-worry-about-their-appearance-for-more-than-90-minutes-a-day/

EHI LIVE 2015: Data Standards and Governance Conference

As part of the its conference series being held at the NEC arena in Birmingham this November, e-health events organisation EHI is showcasing a special meeting on the subjects of data standards and governance in the British National Health Service, the company reported recently.

The Data Standards and Governance Conference, which is being scheduled for the 3rd November 2015 at Birmingham’s NEC Hall 1, will examine the issues of developing guidelines and standards for information exchange within the NHS and other health providers. The NHS holds millions of patient records, research information, study results and other significant quantities of medical data on different websites, databases and cloud services, and there are both legal and corporate protocols to be adhered to in ensuring the safety and integrity of that data.

As the NHS aims to become more environmentally friendly and carbon neutral, there is an increasing trend towards making the health service’s data more paperless. Alongside that, there is a greater emphasis on interoperability between the 15 NHS trusts, 3 foundation trusts, 16 social enterprises and over 8,000 GP practices that compose the NHS, according to figures from the NHS Confederation. The conference aims to address these issues in order for healthcare providers to adopt clear  and governance initiatives to enable the safe, efficient exchange of patient data.

The conference will help attendees explore the challenges in developing standards for information exchange in the NHS as well as a look at the steps being taken to build patient trust for a patient centric health service. This is even more essential as the NHS experiences wave after wave of government cutbacks and internal reorganisation.

(c) US FDA/Wikimedia Commons

Likely conference topics will include the building of trust, patient and staff confidence through the system of information governance; creation of a patient-friendly data strategy, and the utilisation of open-source software in data governance to help reduce computing costs.

The event, which will last from 10:00 am to 4:15 pm on the first day of the EHI 2015 stream of conferences, will begin with a case study on the future of electronic patient information. This will be followed by topics on the ‘Code for Health’, working with Care.data pathfinder CCGs and the economics of open-source programs, along with a special presentation by key NHS ICT supplier Microsoft.

Guest expert speakers will include Malcolm Senior (director of informatics, Taunton and Somerset NHS Foundation Trust), Shane Tickell (chief executive officer, IMS Maxims in Milton Keynes), Peter Coates (open source program head, NHS England) and Eve Roodhouse (programme director for Care.data, HSCIC) among others.

The Data Standards and Governance conference is one of several specialised events to be taking place at EHI 2015. Other planned events include the CCIO Annual Conference, the Health CIO Annual Conference and the HANDI Health Apps Conference, along with many other events focussing on diverse NHS technology discussions around 3D printing, big data and genomic medicine, health and social care, imaging informatics, NHS social media, cloud software and digital primary care services.

DISCLAIMER: The writer is an employee of Informa plc. which is the holding company of EHI Health, the organisers of the EHI 2015 conferences.
SOURCES:
Informa Accounts, The Half-Eaten Mind, Twitter, Twitter Inc. https://twitter.com/halfeatenmind/lists/informa-accounts
Life Sciences Events, Informa Life Sciences, Informa plc., Twitter, Twitter Inc. https://twitter.com/ls_informa
“DATA STANDARDS AND GOVERNANCE” – EHI Live 2015, Informa Life Sciences Exhibitions/Informa PLC http://www.ehilive.co.uk/conference-streams/conferences/data-standards-and-governance/
IMAGE CREDIT:
CC Search, Creative Commons http://search.creativecommons.org/
“File:Desktop Computer – The Future for Medicine (FDA 095) (8249708093).jpg” – The U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Wikimedia Commons (6 December 2012) https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Desktop_Computer_-_The_Future_for_Medicine_(FDA_095)_(8249708093).jpg