TOP DOCS: GP surgery in Forest Gate rated ‘outstanding’

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London, UNITED KINGDOM
VIJAY SHAH and PHOEBE COOKE via Newham Recorder

A doctor’s surgery located in the Newham, east London district of Forest Gate has been rated ‘outstanding’ despite having a caseload of 13,000 patients and at a time when the National Health Service (NHS) is under strain from government cutbacks and pressure on services, local newspaper the Newham Recorder reported yesterday.

The Woodgrange Medical Practice, located on Woodgrange Road in the north of Forest Gate, was recently rated ‘outstanding’ in an inspection report issued by the Care Quality Commission (CQC), an independent regulator of health and social care services in England. Staff at the practice were overjoyed to receive the Commission’s rating, which they ascribed to a ‘team effort’.

 

Woodgrange was particularly commended for its ‘clear vision and leadership’, and CQC inspectors were impressed by its high levels of positive patient feedback and its work with residents with diabetes, asthma and mental health conditions – as well as its use of ‘innovative and proactive methods’ to improve patient outcomes. The surgery, located near Forest Gate rail station, was also lauded for its efficiency and excellence in staff leadership, and also received a secondary ‘good’ rating from the CQC for its record on safety, care and response to patients’ needs.

One of the senior general practitioners (doctors) at Woodgrange Medical Practice, Dr. Muhammad Naqvi, said “I think we are really responsive to the patients’ needs,

“We are working in a difficult climate from a financial perspective but also from the demand – in a borough like Newham the population always in flux.

“We have got a great team and the practice is really well led, we are very conscientious and try to leave no stone unturned.”

Naqvi’s partner GP, Dr. Yusuf Patel added It’s a wonderful acknowledgment and it’s good for Newham,

“This shows a lot of the hard work and team-work that our staff have put in. We just wanted to do our best and show what work our team can do – this is a fantastic surprise.”

The CQC inspection visit in May 2016, also gave special praise to the practice nurse Noreen Gilhespy, whose work at the surgery was also described as outstanding. Gilhespy runs some community group geared towards Forest Gaters’ general health, social interaction and exercise routines.

The surgery currently has 13,000 people on its books, a massive increase from the 1,300 it began with when it opened in 1993. It has been rated four out of five on the NHS Choices patient website.

SOURCES:
Newham Recorder, Facebook, Facebook Inc. https://www.facebook.com/Newham.Recorder/
“Forest Gate GP practice with 13,000 patients rated ‘outstanding’” – Phoebe Cooke, Newham Recorder – News/Archant Community Media Ltd (3 February 2017) http://www.newhamrecorder.co.uk/news/forest_gate_gp_practice_with_13_000_patients_rated_outstanding_1_4875910
IMAGE CREDIT:
“Child at Doctor – Kid at Doctor’s Office” – Wellness GM, Flickr (23 January 2015) https://www.flickr.com/photos/130100316@N04/16162536809
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EDITH MUNRO: Newham pays respects to WWI nurse

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London, UNITED KINGDOM
VIJAY SHAH via The Newham Mag, KAY ATWAL, IAIN BURNS, Newham Recorder and contributors.

 

Military veterans and members of the Jewish community paid their respects this month to a Newham, east London nurse who gave her life in active service for the country at a special memorial service this past week, council magazine The Newham Mag reports.

The nurse, Edith Hilda Munro, was born in a well-off household in Hackney, the daughter of Scottish engineer John Munro, and local Leah Nathan, and had three brothers and sisters. She first began her illustrious career in the Albert Dock Seaman’s Hospital of Custom House, in the south of the London borough, before finding work with the Voluntary Aid Detachment shortly after it was founded in 1909, a group which sent nurses to treat the injured in war zones. Upon the outbreak of World War I, Munro tended to soldiers injured in the battlefields of Europe.

First World War recruitment poster for the Vol...
First World War recruitment poster for the Voluntary Aid Detachment . (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Tragically, Munro contracted acute bronchopneumonia, a dangerous lung disease. She then developed heart failure and passed away at the tender age of 23, on the 12th December, 1916. She was then buried by family in East Ham. Sadly she was not regarded as a casualty of war and her grave, in East Ham’s Plashet Jewish Cemetery, laid undiscovered until a research team led by Harold Pollins and Martin Sugarman, with the involvement of AJEX (Association of Jewish Ex-Service Men and Women) discovered her details and began to piece together Edith’s story.

Her gravestone was eventually reconsecrated and the Commonwealth War Graves Commission gave Edith her long awaited and deserved recognition as a war casualty.

The special stone-setting ceremony at the ancient Plashet cemetery was officiated over by Rabbi  Livingstone, senior Jewish chaplain to the Armed Forces. Also in attendance were Newham politicians, members of London’s Jewish community and representatives of St. John’s Ambulance. Also paying their respects were three distant descendants of Edith Munro.

Wreaths of poppies, a symbol of the World Wars, were laid at Munro’s grave while the military theme The Last Post was played. Local historian Stan Kaye, who also contributed to the research team’s efforts, said “It was a very emotional service,”

“I kept thinking what it must have been like 100 years ago when she was buried in this cemetery – cold, and in the middle of the war.”

Newham Council‘s chair and civic lead, Cllr. Joy Laguda, herself a former nurse, who attended the reconsecration ceremony and laid a wreath on behalf of the council, commented: “The stone is a lasting legacy to Edith’s valour”

The Voluntary Aid Detachment (VAD) was founded in 1909 by the UK armed forces alongisde St. John’s Ambulance and the Red Cross. The VAD nurses, virtually all women, treated battlefield injuries and became renowned and respected for their courage under fire. Many were killed in action from bombing or contracting infections. Hundreds were killed in the Spanish flu epidemic of 1918, and relatives of VAD nurses who died in the call of duty have long struggled to get their contributions to the war effort properly recognised.

Edith Hilda Munro

Birth:  unknown
Death:  Dec. 12, 1916
West Ham
Greater London, England

She was a VAD nurse, died aged 23.Deaths Dec 1916 Munro Edith H 23 W.Ham 4a 173
 
 
Burial:
Plashet Jewish Cemetery
East Ham
London Borough of Newham
Greater London, England
Plot: plot M.24.35
SOURCES:
“Brave nurse is saluted” – The Newham Mag, Newham Council [Issue 337] (8 April 2016)
“Nurse buried in East Ham was ‘war casualty’ ” – Kay Atwal, Newham Recorder/London24 news network/Archant Community Media Ltd (14 April 2012) http://www.newhamrecorder.co.uk/news/nurse_buried_in_east_ham_was_war_casualty_1_1348254
“Silvertown war nurse remembered century after dying aged 23” – Iain Burns, Newham Recorder/London24 news network/Archant Community Media Ltd (20 March 2016) http://www.newhamrecorder.co.uk/news/silvertown_war_nurse_remembered_century_after_dying_aged_23_1_4458309
“Edith Hilda Munro” – Geoffrey Gillon & Stanley Kaye, Find A Grave (25 July 2013) http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=114347036
IMAGE CREDIT:
“File:VAD poster.jpg” – Voluntary Aid Detachment & Lumos3, Wikimedia Commons (13 June 2008) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:VAD_poster.jpg

MANOR PARK: Newham school in pole position to recieve Tesco ‘garden grant’

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London, UNITED KINGDOM
VIJAY SHAH via Newham Recorder

A primary school in Manor Park, east London is set to receive £12,000 towards developing gardens for their pupils as part of a charity drive by a local newspaper and the supermarket chain Tesco, the Newham Recorder reported yesterday.

Kensington Primary School, which caters to pupils aged between 3 and 11 years, was a finalist in a competition run between Tesco and the Newham Recorder as part of Tesco’s Bags of Help scheme, which has a pot of £30,000 from sales of carrier bags which will be split into three grants of £8,000, £10,000 or £12,000. Members of the public will get to decide which school or organisation will benefit from the scheme. Shoppers will be able to vote for who gets which grant at their local Tesco supermarket from the 27th February to the 6th March 2016.

English: Tesco Express local store in Trowbrid...
English: Tesco Express local store in Trowbridge, Wiltshire, UK (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Staff at the primary school plan to overhaul the outdoor spaces in order to ‘provide a vibrant and educational outdoor environment’, the Newham Recorder commented. Kensington Primary’s business manager, Shazidur Rahman, spoke with the Recorder as to why his school needed the grant.

“Something we’ve found is that a lot of the kids don’t have a local park to go to,” Rahman said.

“We want to put lots of different flowers and plants in and teach the children about them.”

Kensington Primary has already identified a number of suitable places on its premises to redevelop in order to bring the outdoors to its pupils’ doorstep and give them valuable educational and recreational opportunities which are otherwise in short supply locally.

Rahman further commented “It depends when we get the money, but we hope to start work this spring,”

“We think the school holidays might be a good time to get people in and work on the garden.”

Other than overhauling the school’s open spaces, the primary also plans to purchase large planters for the playground, special signs to indicate different types of plants, learning trails and specially commissioned wall art, all of which are intended to improve the school environment and appearance, as well as help their young pupils learn about their natural world and surroundings.

“It’s fantastic that we’re one of the shortlisted organisations,” said Rahman.

“The more money we can get, the more we can develop the school.”

The Tesco Bags of Help scheme is run all across England and Wales and involves community groups bidding for shares of £30,000 grants allocated to 390 regions identified by the supermarket nationally as one of the UK’s largest grocery outlets. The grants come from the sale of 5-pence carrier bags by Tesco stores, which the retailer has been legally obliged to charge for since October 2015.

SOURCES:
“Manor Park school to receive grant for garden project” – Sophie Morton, Newham Recorder/London24 news network/Archant Community Media Ltd (20 February 2016) http://www.newhamrecorder.co.uk/news/manor_park_school_to_receive_grant_for_garden_project_1_4426398
“Kensington Primary School – Newham”, Kensington Primary School http://www.kensington.newham.sch.uk/
IMAGE CREDIT:
“File:TescoExpress.jpg” – Rodhullandemu, Wikimedia Commons (9 May 2009) https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:TescoExpress.jpg

SUBLETTING: Newham tenant jailed for illegally renting out council house

A tenant living in a council-owned property in east London has been sent to jail after he was discovered to have been illegally renting out his home against council rules, the Newham Mag reported this weekend.

Mubato Nzabi, aged 48, was caught out by council housing inspectors in the borough of Newham, and was subsequently convicted at Wood Green Crown Court in north London of illegally subletting a three-bedroom council house in Ordnance Road, Canning Town, in the south of the borough. He allegedly lied to the council’s housing department and the Department of Work and Pensions, a national government body in charge of benefits and employment services, claiming that he was residing in the property himself along with his daughter.

English: Canning Town: Normandy Terrace, E16 C...
English: Canning Town: Normandy Terrace, E16 Community shops at the southern end of Freemasons Road. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

In court proceedings, the judge and jury were informed that in fact, Nzabi had been renting out the property to an unnamed family since April 2013, after moving out of the property into another home, and had failed to notify the council of his change in living situation. Nzabi however continued to claim government welfare benefits, namely housing and council tax benefit, under his name for the Canning Town address despite no longer living there. He had originally moved into the property in 1994.

Nzabi’s con was unravelled after Newham Council‘s housing inspectors turned up at his subletted property for an inspection as part of their regular housing checks made to ensure council tenants are actually living in their assigned homes.

The crown court prosecuted Nzabi for falsely claiming benefits, council tax evasion and illegally subletting under the Fraud Act and the Social Security Administration Act. He was sentenced to nine months in prison at the hearing on July 24th, the Newham Recorder reported.

Mayoral advisor for housing, Cllr. Andrew Baikie, told the Recorder: “This successful prosecution shows that we take illegal subletting very seriously and will take tough action against anyone we catch.

“Illegally subletting council properties unfairly deprives someone else of a council house, who may have been waiting on our register for a long time. It is imperative that our housing stock is distributed fairly.”

Meanwhile, Newham Council, concerned about the large number of illegal sublettings of their homes in one of London’s most crowded areas, are running an amnesty for subletting tenants to turn over their properties without risk of prosecution. The amnesty, which runs until the 1st of September, allows subletters to hand over their house keys and give up their properties without being taken to court.

Cllr. Bailie said of the situation: “We take illegal subletting seriously and will take tough action against anyone we catch”. Newham council tenants wishing to avail of the amnesty are urged to call 020 3373 9370.

According to figures produced by insurance firm Direct Line and the Association of Residential Letting Agents, it is estimated that 3.3 million people are living as unofficial tenants in the UK, amounting to one in every ten rental homes. Almost fifty per cent of surveyed residential lettings agencies have found multiple occupants in homes supposedly registered to single persons or families after carrying out inspections of tenancies, according to the ARLA.

SOURCES:
“Jailed for illegally subletting council home” – The Newham Mag [Issue 322], Newham Council (27 August 2015)
“Canning Town council tenant jailed for illegally subletting flat” – Seema Hakim, Newham Recorder/London24 news network/Archant Community Media Ltd (7 August 2015) http://www.newhamrecorder.co.uk/news/crime-court/canning_town_council_tenant_jailed_for_illegally_subletting_flat_1_4185732
“UNAUTHORISED SUBLETTING IS A MAJOR PROBLEM FACING LANDLORDS AND AGENTS” – Association of Residential Letting Agents/National Federation Of Property Professionals (9 October 2014) http://www.arla.co.uk/news/october-2014/unauthorised-subletting-is-a-major-problem-facing-landlords-and-agents.aspx
IMAGE CREDIT:
“File:Canning Town, Normandy Terrace, E16 – geograph.org.uk – 408315.jpg” – Nigel Cox & geograph.org.uk via Wikimedia Commons (20 April 2007) https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Canning_Town,_Normandy_Terrace,_E16_-_geograph.org.uk_-_408315.jpg

 

 

EAST HAM RACIST ASSAULT: Three teenagers attacked outside pub

The families of three teenagers who were targeted in a racially-motivated attack outside an East Ham public house are appealing for witnesses who saw the assault, reports the Newham Recorder this week.

Stephanie Villegas and Hollie Vincent, both aged sixteen years, were walking down the High Street South, a major road linking East Ham with Canning Town, with their cousin Rohan Reda (aged 17), when two older men began hurling racist abuse at them as they walked past the White Horse pub, opposite East Ham’s Central Park. The incident occurred at around 6 pm on Thursday 11th June.

The teenagers then claimed that the two men approached them, punched them, and then threw them to the floor in the unprovoked attack.

English: East Ham High St. This is a photo of ...
English: East Ham High St. This is a photo of High St North East Ham, taken looking south towards the station. Sibley Grove is on the left. The pub on the corner is amusingly named the Overdraft Tavern (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

“It was disgusting. We had already walked past them once”

“A little while after, we walked past them again and that’s when it started. They were older men, at least in their forties” Hollie told a reporter from the Newham Recorder. Hollie’s cousin Rohan, who is of mixed heritage, was then subjected to a racial slur.

Hollie, who had recently graduated from her studies at local Brampton Manor Academy (formerly Brampton Manor School) recalled in the interview that the attack began when one of the men accused Rohan of ‘eyeballing’ him, meaning that the attacker thought that the 17-year-old was looking at him in a contemptuous way. The men then began following the three teens down High Street South and one is said to have thrown an apple at the teenagers as they tried to avoid a confrontation with the racists. Hollie then tried to confront the men over their behaviour.

“That is when we asked them to leave us alone, but he punched me in the face and I fell to the ground” Hollie narrated.

During the attack, the Newham Reporter also states that Stephanie’s hair was pulled, her phone was smashed and that the thugs also snatched a chain from around Rohan’s neck.

Hollie added “I’ve lived in this area my whole life but have never seen anything like it”

“The worst thing was people were actually standing there and watching, but finally two schoolboys came to help us”

“All three of us were assaulted. It was a racist attack against my cousin and I just don’t understand how two grown men assault two young girls”.

As of publishing date by the Newham Recorder, there have been no arrests made and police inquiries are still ongoing. Local police are appealing for witnesses to come forward in confidence.

Anyone with information about the East Ham incident should call police on 101 or alternatively, call Crimestoppers on 0800 555 111. You do not have to give your name or any identifying details.

SOURCE:
“Three teenagers attacked by grown men in ‘racist’ attack” – Seema Hakim, Newham Recorder, Archant Community Media Limited (17 June 2015)
IMAGE CREDIT:
“File:East Ham High St – geograph.org.uk – 61623.jpg” –  Glyn Baker, geograph.org.uk & Wikimedia Commons (5 October 2005) https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:East_Ham_High_St_-_geograph.org.uk_-_61623.jpg

PRINCE’S TRUST: Helping in the war against east London’s youth unemployment

The Prince’s Trust, a charity with royal patronage that helps disadvantaged young people, has recently held an event near east London to help get young jobseekers a foothold into the world of employment this past week.

The “What’s Stopping You?” event was held by the Prince’s Trust at its head office in central London and saw young people from all over east London converge to learn about effective jobhunting and support in building their confidence. The event was sponsored by Barclays bank, which has regular callouts for graduates and apprentices from the east London area, which covers boroughs such as Hackney, Newham and Tower Hamlets. These boroughs have some of the highest rates of youth and general unemployment in the country.

(c) West Midlands Police/Flickr

The event offered a special Prince’s Trust Team programme running for twelve weeks. One graduate from nearby Tower Hamlets, who had sent out hundreds of applications but failed to secure a single interview, found the programme was exactly what she needed. In an interview with the Newham Recorder local paper, she commended the event for helping councillors and other decision-makers get to grips with the barriers facing young people seeking work. The Prince’s Trust Team programme teaches valuable skills in CV writing, interview techniques, work presentation and other means to search for a life-changing career. 

Another member of the programme had been unemployed for three years after leaving school at the age of sixteen. She has lost all confidence in herself and was fast shedding all her hopes for the future. Thanks to the Prince’s Trust, she is now on course to starting a university course in medicine and hopes to become a doctor.

Dermot Finch, a director with the Prince’s Trust, echoed concerns that the rising tide of youth unemployment is damaging the hopes and aspirations of a whole generation, as the British job economy licks its wounds from the impact of a triple-dip recession following the infamous credit crunch of 2008. He noted that it was a particular problem for east Londoners who have left school, college or university recently and that young people need all the support they can find to source a job. Meanwhile, Tower Hamlets councillor Shafiqul Haque, the cabinet member in Tower Hamlets for jobs and skills, added that Tower Hamlets council was committed to helping young people fulfill their potential through finding work or professional opportunities such as self-starting a business. The councillor also commended the Prince’s Trust event for highlighting the issues of youth joblessness so that councils and charities can work together to reverse the trend. 

The Prince’s Trust is a charity set up by HRH Prince Charles of the United Kingdom. It offers practical and financial support to disadvantaged young people, giving them the confidence and key skills needed to help them find gainful employment. Their services are primarily aimed at 13-30 year olds who have been in care, are long-term unemployed, been excluded from school or who have been in trouble with the police. Since 1976, the Trust has helped over  750,000 young people, with an extra 100 helped every day. The charity offers events and trips out for its users, as well as engagement activities, progression support and peer mentoring. It helps young people gain qualifications and offers programmes designed by and for young people. The charity relies heavily on donations from the public and benefactors.

More than one in four young people in Newham are struggling to find a job – a total of 27 per cent – while in Tower Hamlets 21 per cent are struggling, according to the Office for National Statistics as cited by the Newham Recorder report today. The Prince’s Trust quotes figures on their website thataround one in five young people in the UK are not in work, education or training. Youth unemployment costs the UK economy £10 million a day in lost productivity, while youth crime costs £1 billion every year“. Youth unemployment has been exacerbated by the recession and government austerity cuts and young people have borne the brunt of massive job cuts and layoffs in the private sector.

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SOURCES:
Vijay Shah { विजय } on Twitter LINK
Newham Recorder on Twitter LINK
“Prince’s Trust event tackles youth unemployment in east London‏” – Adam Barnett, Newham Recorder/Archant Community Media Ltd. (27 December 2013) LINK
“PRINCE’S TRUST OFFICES” – The Prince’s Trust LINK
“ABOUT THE TRUST” – The Prince’s Trust LINK
“PRINCE’S TRUST PROGRAMMES” – The Prince’s Trust LINK
IMAGE CREDIT:
“Day 54 – West Midlands Police Princes Trust Partnership” – West Midlands Police/Flickr (22 February 2012) LINK