PHOTO MOMENT: Foxy Bear

 

 

A furry and fluffy blast from the past. On the 8th of January, 2013, a friend and former colleague of mine received this teddy bear as a gift. With his chunky paws and smart tartan bowtie, Foxy Bear, as he came to be called, took pride of place on our bank of desks in Fitzrovia, while doing sweet-all work himself. Sadly the bear went walkies some time later and his current location is unknown, although I suspect he took off with another ex-colleague. Farewell, Foxy Bear.

P.S. You might spot someone familiar peering at Foxy in the background.

IMAGE CREDIT:
Andreea Frasinescu.

PHOTO MOMENT: The BT Tower

 

A window view of the BT Tower, in Fitzrovia, central London. I took this picture on the 28th of August, 2012, on the first day at my new office in Tottenham Court Road, after my company relocated there from our old site in Bressenden Place, Victoria which was scheduled for demolition.

The BT Tower, formerly known as the ‘Post Office Tower’, was first built in 1961, with construction completed in 1964. Standing in at 191 metres (627 ft), it was initially devised by the then General Post Office as a means of ferrying telecommunications traffic from London to the rest of the UK. It was the tallest structure in London up until the 1980s, and had its own rooftop restaurant which sadly closed in the same decade.

ADDITIONAL SOURCE/IMAGE CREDIT:
“BT Tower” – Wikipedia/Wikimedia Foundation, Inc. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BT_Tower
Vijay Shah via Facebook.

PHOTO MOMENT: Long hugs

 

“Sometimes, that’s all you need.”

A hug is a good way to release feel-good endorphins into the bloodstream. It is also a quick, simple and ‘warm and fuzzy’ way of reinforcing human relationships (and human-other animal ones too). Even for me, though I’m not the most touchy-feely person, a warm and firm hug from a loved one just makes me feel so much better.

So go ahead, give someone you care about a hug today. It is free after all.

SOURCES:
Vijay Shah { विजय }, Twitter, Twitter Inc. https://twitter.com/VShah1984
#BAE, Twitter, Twitter Inc. https://twitter.com/Hashtag_Bae
IMAGE CREDITS:
cute couple things, Tumblr http://cute-couples-things.tumblr.com/

PHOTO MOMENT: Fortune cookie earrings

 

A set of earrings featuring charms influenced by the popular Chinese restaurant snacks known as fortune cookies. Produced by Tamara Lance of the U.S. artisan jewellers Musing Tree Studios, the earrings are finished with rounded ceramic beads evocative of Ming porcelain vases and flat beads of turquoise howlite.

SOURCES/IMAGE CREDIT:
Half-Eaten Mind, Twitter, Twitter Inc. https://twitter.com/halfeatenmind
First Night Design, Twitter, Twitter Inc. https://twitter.com/FirstNightArt
Musing Tree Studios, Twitter, Twitter Inc. https://twitter.com/musingtree
“Chinese Fortune Cookie Earrings, Good Fortune Jewelry, Chinese Takeout Earrings, Chinese Earrings, Asian Jewelry.” – Tamara Lance and Musing Tree Studios via Etsy https://www.etsy.com/listing/294317593/chinese-fortune-cookie-earrings-good?utm_source=etsyfu&utm_medium=api&utm_campaign=api

 

PHOTO MOMENT: The long hop of the law

 

Don’t be stealing any Easter eggs, otherwise Bunny Cop here will haul you in.

The Half-Eaten Mind wishes you a very happy Easter!!

 

IMAGE CREDITS:
Sheik Atchia.
Facebook, Facebook Inc. https://www.facebook.com/

A GLIMPSE OF NATIVE AMERICA: 1972 reservation photos by Terry Eiler

Two children ride along on a beige-coloured horse, the same colour as the sands on the pathway. Three more kids, excited and full of activity run after the steed towards what appears to be a cow farm. A photo captures their exuberance. This photo, and many others, forms part of an online gallery by web magazine Mashable. More famed for their millennial-angled technology journalism, Mashable instead travelled back in time to a simpler age, showcasing a series of photos taken on various Native American reservations and nearby towns in 1972.

In 1972, the United States federal government, which was looking into the conditions of the (currently) 1.4 million people living on lands set aside for the First Nations, employed the services of photographer Terry Eiler to visit the south-west of the country and give an outsiders view into the lives of some of the most disadvantaged of Americans, many of whom had their lands seized by white settlers during the ‘Wild West‘ days of the 19th century and were herded onto the reservations, often poor-quality and non-arable land allocated by the federal government and administered by the nations themselves under the auspices of the Bureau of Indian Affairs. Nowadays many Native American communities struggle with lack of employment and amenities, as well as social ills such as extreme poverty, alcoholism and drug abuse.

Back in 1972, as the Native American rights movement was in its earliest days, Eiler visited three reservations belonging to the Navajo, Hopi and Havasupai reservations. The Navajo nation‘s reservation was the largest, about the same size as the US state of West Virginia. The photographer also visited the village of Supai, nestled in the Grand Canyon of Colorado, said to be the most remote human habitation in the southern ’48 states’ region and accessible only by an eight-mile hike through rocky terrain or via helicopter.

Eiler’s photo project provides an snapshot into a part of America few outside the First Nations have even seen, let alone understood. He shows a world that was becoming modernised and similar to mainstream America but at the same time, was still clinging tenaciously to their traditions, forged over millennia. His subjects are natural and act as themselves, a stark contrast to the wooden and forced appearances of Native Americans made to pose in the sepia photographs from the ‘pioneer days’.

His photos cover a wide range of subjects, from a sheep paddock in the desert sands of the Navajo reservation in Arizona, a retinue of cute lambs staring back at the camera, their white wool contrasting strongly with the ochre ground underneath their hooves, to a Navajo woman in a bright red blouse standing for a quick snap near the Arizonan town of Shiprock.

Others show Native American families and men out and about, gardening, horse riding and being at home. While clearly getting on with life, it is obvious that the living conditions were at times very different from most American communities, but also shows the industriousness of the Navajo and other peoples, whether cramming into a truck to get to work, training as teachers, or selling bead necklaces to tourists visiting the reservations. Local scenery, especially the Havasu Falls of Arizona, also makes a frequent appearance in Eiler’s collection.

The Eiler collection is now part of the U.S. National Archives. You can view all the pictures by clicking HERE.

SOURCES:
Vijay Shah { विजय }, Twitter, Twitter Inc. https://twitter.com/VShah1984
Twistools, Twitter, Twitter Inc. https://twitter.com/twistools_en
“1972 Native American reservations” – Alex Q. Arbuckle, Mashable – Retronaut (27 February 2016) http://mashable.com/2016/02/27/native-american-reservations/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+Mashable+%28Mashable%29#sJ06qJkI8kqp

 

CHRISTMAS 2015: HEM festive graphic

 

This year’s wallpaper is influenced by the humble Christmas tree, with its merry decoration and celebration of creativity and light. The basis for this year’s graphic is a picture from a photo wallpaper site, the Wallpaper Abyss, depicting a row of trees decked out in blue fairy lights. The text used aligns with the photo’s colour scheme very well and keeps the theme running.

I prepped the image using an old favourite of ours, piZap. It took only around fifteen minutes yesterday morning and is now officially launched today. It will be used here and on the Half-Eaten Mind Facebook page.

I and the Half-Eaten Mind wishes each and every one of you, our friends, supporters, loyal readers, and visitors a very merry Christmas!

IMAGE CREDITS:
“Proudly Serving 2190 Christmas Wallpapers” – Wallpaper Abyss – Alpha Coders/Alpha Coders http://wall.alphacoders.com/by_sub_category.php?id=152808
piZap http://pizap.com/

PHOTO MOMENT: Happy Hallowe’en from Bottom’s Richie and Eddie

 

A scene from the Ninetie’s BBC comedy series ‘Bottom’ that starred the late Rik Mayall and Ade Edmondson. In the Hallowe’en special, titled “Terror” and first broadcast on the 13th January 1995, scuzzy but hilarious flatmates Eddie Hitler (Edmondson) and Richard Richard (Mayall) decide to go out trick-or-treating to make some extra cash. In the above scene, they dress as a banana and devil to strike fear into the locals. Poor old Richie however falls victim to the laxative effects of an electric cattle prod they plan to use to extort Hammersmith‘s residents for a few spooky pennies. A highly amusing comedy gem that will have you reaching for a fresh new pair of tights in no time.

HAPPY HALLOWE’EN!!

SOURCES:
BBC http://www.bbc.co.uk/
Bottom, Facebook, Facebook Inc. https://www.facebook.com/HammersmithHardmen/?fref=nf