BAFTA: Guru LIVE sessions this bank holiday weekend

gb

London, UNITED KINGDOM
VIJAY SHAH via BAFTA

The British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA) is organising a special series of sessions to offer the latest tips and advice for people working in the industries of film, television and game design this month. The academy, well-known for its yearly televised BAFTA Awards honouring the best in British television, has unveiled ‘Guru LIVE’. This is three days of talks and discussion panels with leading lights in the media industry.

The event, which takes place in London over the May Bank Holiday weekend from April 30th to May 2nd, will see attendees receive advice and insights in their chosen industry from BAFTA Award winners, nominees and the Academy’s industrial partners.

BAFTA have also released a YouTube trailer to encourage people starting out in the creative industries to come and bring their ideas and how to get a foot in the door.

Tickets cost only £6 per session, making Guru LIVE ideal for students on a tight budget.

BAFTA is a independent charity that support and nurtures film and TV talent and production in the U.K.,  by identifying and rewarding excellence, inspiring practitioners and benefiting the public. It offers training and networking opportunities via workshops, masterclasses, scholarships, lectures and mentoring schemes, connecting with audiences of all ages and backgrounds across the U.K. and abroad in Los Angeles and New York, U.S.A.

SOURCES:
HEM Businesses, The Half-Eaten Mind, Twitter, Twitter Inc. https://twitter.com/halfeatenmind/lists/hem-businesses
Film London, Twitter, Twitter Inc. https://twitter.com/Film_London
BAFTA Guru, Twitter, Twitter Inc. https://twitter.com/BAFTAGuru
“Guru LIVE” – Guru, British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA) http://guru.bafta.org/live
“About” – British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA) http://www.bafta.org/about
VIDEO CREDIT:
“Kick-start your career in film, TV or games with Guru Live!” – BAFTA Guru, YouTube GB (1 March 2016) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FooLCR4nxSw
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BRIGHTON SEARCH ENGINE WORKSHOP: SEO by the seaside

Brighton, UNITED KINGDOM
VIJAY SHAH via journalism.co.uk

If you have ever been curious of the benefits and uses of search engine optimisation (and enjoy nibbling the occasional pizza slice along the way) then a special workshop being held by journalism news site and trainer journalism.co.uk alongside lecturer Adam Tinworth may help give you a taster.

Search engine optimisation (SEO) is the technique of using selected keywords and tags to help make your article, website or blog more visible in search results in places like Google and Bing. While some blogging sites like WordPress provide SEO as standard, for many other providers, you are left on your own to figure out how to maximise your presence on search results and get a foot in on that coveted first page.

The vast majority of traffic to news sites and blogs still arrives via search engines, therefore maintaining good knowledge of the principles of SEO is extremely important for anyone with an online presence, whether writing news or running a business.

Google is by far the most popular vehicle for searches and has recently undergone some mammoth changes,  with the Panda, Penguin and Hummingbird updates shifting the search landscape beyond recognition. This has meant journalists and other having to adapt and move with the shift. The SEO knowledge of years gone by is now actually harmful to websites’ position in search results as Google now places emphasis on ‘high quality’ content and fresh information rather than simply keywords, to close the door on keyword spammers and link farms. Sadly many web publishers are still stuck behind in the times, suing models from 2008 that are doing them more harm than good.

To combat this problem, journalism.co.uk have launched a intensive and informative three-hour course at their offices in Brighton, where lecturer and visiting City University Journalism department professor Adam Tinworth will explain and guide attendees through the current principles of SEO, as well as techniques on improving the SEO value of already published content and sites. Prof. Tinworth has experience in digital journalism, blogging, training and publishing strategy. He has worked as a journalist for 20 years, and now as a consultant, has worked with several big names in media, including the Financial Times and the Telegraph, as well as smaller publishers and businesses. He has also been a blogger for a decade, writing at One Man & His Blog.

The workshop is ideal for media professionals such as employed journalists, freelancers, media students and others working in PR, marketing and communications. It will be held in an informal way in a relaxed setting. You will get free complimentary pizza as well as tea and coffee to keep your mind sharp, as well as opportunities to meet fellow professionals.

What will the course cover?

  • How to write for search
  • How to write great SEO headlines (that aren’t dull)
  • How to identify, analyse and use keywords – without overusing them
  • How to help search engines understand the meaning of your page
  • The role of linking in good SEO
  • Mistakes to avoid
  • How to keep up with SEO changes

Tutor(s): Adam Tinworth
Starts: 18:00 1 February 2016
Finishes: 21:00 1 February 2016
Location: Shaftesbury Court, 95 Ditchling Road, Brighton BN1 4ST
Price: £80 (inc. VAT)

You can book a place on the journalism.co.uk Brighton SEO workshop by visiting the third article in the ‘Sources’ below and clicking the small dark pink button marked ‘Book Now’ when you reach the journalism.co.uk site.

SOURCES:
HEM Journalism Portal, Half-Eaten Mind, Twitter, Twitter Inc. https://twitter.com/halfeatenmind/lists/hem-journalism-portal
Journalism.co.uk, Twitter, Twitter Inc. https://twitter.com/journalismnews
“SEO essentials” – journalism.co.uk – Courses/Mousetrap Media Ltd https://www.journalism.co.uk/vocational-skills-study/seo-essentials/s43/a562965/?utm_content=bufferceaa6&utm_medium=social&utm_source=twitter.com&utm_campaign=buffer
Adam Tinworth, Twitter, Twitter Inc. https://twitter.com/adders
IMAGE CREDIT:
Getty Images via Zemanta.

 

NEWHAM GUIDE DOGS: Residents offered chance to train up puppies

The Guide Dogs for the Blind Association in the east London borough of Newham is offering local residents a unique opportunity to bring some puppy love into their lives by helping train the next generation of guide dogs (seeing-eye dogs), the Newham Mag reports.

The charity, which helps procure and train up dogs to assist blind and partially-sighted people in their day-to-day lives, is currently appealing for Newham residents to help give a temporary home to guide dog puppies. This volunteering role, known as Puppy Walking, also involves training and socialising of the young dogs, so as to prepare them for new careers living in owners’ homes. They can also learn to be comfortable around people and carrying out activities like crossing the road. Puppy Walking enables the puppy to be socially well behaved, affectionate and responsive to their future owner’s needs.

Would-be Puppy Walkers are needed to provide full-time care and education to a puppy from the ages of seven weeks to between twelve and fourteen months, when they will be returned to the Guide Dogs Association for advanced training to graduate as fully fledged guide dogs.

English: Golden Retriever Puppy
English: Golden Retriever Puppy (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

One resident from West Ham, Jackie Palmer, who already is an experienced Puppy Walking volunteer, told the magazine: “I have enjoyed every minute with my guide dog puppy. He is a joy to have and the kids love him. I have met so many people since becoming a Puppy Walker and I have seen and heard first-hand the benefits a trained guide has in the life of a visually impaired person”. Ms Palmer is looking after a black Golden Retriever puppy named Wolf.

Looking after a future guide dog requires a lot of time, commitment and love from volunteers and their families, but will result in a very special animal indeed, according to the Guide Dogs Association website. The charity advises volunteers to care for the puppy in much the same way as they would care for a young child, giving the puppy lots of love, affection and attention. Volunteers will need to be at least 18 years of age, due to the responsibility required. They must be able to commit the time needed to look after a puppy, with very young trainee guide dogs needing up to three hours of full-time care a day. Volunteers must also have suitable space in their homes including provision for a special hard-surfaced or gravelled toilet area, and be willing to take the puppy outside around busy places on a regular basis.

If you live in the United Kingdom, and you have what it takes to be a Puppy Walker, you can call the Guide Dogs hotline on 0845 371 7771. Alternatively email the charity at volunteer @ guidedogs.org.uk, visit the Puppy Walking information pages online at www.guidedogs.org.uk/puppywalking or visit the links listed under ‘Sources’ below this article.

SOURCES:
“Help train guide dogs” – The Newham Mag <Issue 313>, Newham Council (10 April 2015)
“Puppy walkers” – Guide Dogs, The Guide Dogs for the Blind Association http://www.guidedogs.org.uk/supportus/volunteering/what-can-i-do/puppy-walkers/#.VSpY3_nF8rU
“Essential criteria for puppy walking” – Guide Dogs, The Guide Dogs for the Blind Association http://www.guidedogs.org.uk/supportus/volunteering/what-can-i-do/puppy-walkers/essential-criteria-for-puppy-walking#.VSpag_nF8rU
IMAGE CREDIT:
“File:Golden Retriever puppy 2010.jpg” – Mtlchung, Wikimedia Commons (5 February 2010) http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Golden_Retriever_puppy_2010.jpg

 

JOURNALISM APPRENTICESHIP: Editors, NCTJ to develop higher on-the-job journalist training

Britain‘s National Council for the Training of Journalists (NCTJ) reports that it is currently working with journalism employers from several newspapers and TV channels to develop a programme of higher apprenticeships for journalists to acquire news-writing skills on the job. Their plans were formally announced in a news release published on the council’s website this past Thursday (23 October 2014). The NCTJ along with selected employers had recently pitched their idea of a higher apprenticeship to the British government. Ministers there have now given the new qualification system the green light of approval in their efforts to tackle rising youth unemployment in the country.

A group of journalism representatives from a variety of national and regional media organisations including Archant, the BBC; BSkyB; i; The IndependentIndependent on SundayJohnston Press; the KM GroupLondon Evening Standard; the Mark Allen Group; Newsquest; MNA Media and the Telegraph Media Group, jointly submitted an application to Whitehall which has been approved as part of the Conservative-Liberal Democrat coalition‘s ‘phase three’ trailblazer apprenticeship scheme to help unemployed and undecided youngsters obtain valuable skills that will prepare them for future careers in the media. Traditionally, British journalists were taken on as junior reporters after completing their formal education. They received on-the-job training from senior news workers and editors, but in the past fifteen years an increasing emphasis by the U.K. jobs market on university qualifications universally has seen the journalism apprenticeships of several decades ago become almost obsolete. Newer cohorts of media hopefuls tend to be university graduates who pick up training via often unpaid or expenses only work experience. Media organisations have lately been criticised for not being inclusive enough in their intake of new employees and several major news providers have reinstated internships and apprentice training courses to attract new recruits from less well-represented sections of society.

The trailblazer scheme aims to give employers more say and freedom to develop apprenticeship standards in their industry which will help deliver the practical skills needed by vocational trainees for a particular business sector.

The new journalism apprenticeship was announced the day Skills Minister Nick Boles visited the offices of international media outlet Sky, home of Sky News and Sky Television, to meet with Bella Vuillermoz, director of their training school, the Sky Academy, to discuss training opportunities for young and new journalists moving into the career away from the university pathway favoured by most recruiters in the current media environment. Boles also conversed with Nicola Hart, Sky’s head of future talent; Andy Cairns, its executive editor, and Laurie Tucker, head of training at Sky Sports News; and Joanne Butcher, chief executive of the NCTJ, who is co-ordinating the industry’s apprenticeship trailblazer projects.

In a discussion on the government’s trailblazer scheme and its wider changes to the national apprenticeship and employment programme, the NCTJ chief executive lauded the improvements to the initiative, saying that the old system had now been made more streamlined and simplified and that she was encouraged to see  greater responsibility and autonomy allocated to employers and the NCTJ in attracting more learners to the UK media industry’s training courses. She did however criticise the ongoing reliance on jargon within the programme, which may put off potential apprentices from signing up. Meanwhile, Sky’s head of training apparently joked that at a recent meeting he had struggled with the shorthand outline for ‘synoptic assessment’. Boles also had the opportunity to meet Britain’s first journalism apprentice undergoing training thanks to the trailblazer scheme, James Kilpatrick. Kilpatrick is now interning at Sky Sports News and is one of 18 apprentices on the second NCTJ apprenticeship day release course at Lambeth College in south London. James will experience all aspects of the Sky Sports News operation, starting with the digital media team, with an aim to give him and his fellow apprentices a well-rounded experience of the day-to-day life as a Sky journalist.

The higher apprenticeship by the NCTJ is following in the path of an existing standard for junior apprenticeships in journalism set up by the council in league with employers. This standard, although complete, will not come into force in England until 2015. It will be an update of the current apprenticeship qualification offered by the NCTJ to trainee reporters who wish to forego the usual graduation route. The proposed senior journalist apprenticeship will also now be written to an industry standard to be decided by the NCTJ with consultations from the media industry expected to commence  in the New Year.

Chairman of the journalism apprenticeship group, David Rowell said: “This is an exciting new development in our apprenticeship training scheme and will provide an opportunity for school leavers to progress to more senior roles.

Skills minister Nick Boles said: “I congratulate the journalism employers for the key role they are playing in developing new top-quality apprenticeships. Through the trailblazers initiative companies, in collaboration with their industry partners, will give people the skills they need to thrive and our businesses need to compete.

The full guidance document for the British government’s phase three of the trailblazer scheme for apprentices can be viewed here.

Several media organisations in the United Kingdom already run their own training programmes and apprenticeships for students, including the BBC, Sky and ITV, offering training with actual journalists in fields such as broadcasting, public relations, digital/new media and radio. The BBC’s Academy of Journalism attracts thousands of applications from would-be trainees every year, with only a small number successfully securing places. The NCTJ, which is the official body for journalism training in the U.K., offers its own qualifications and accreditations which are highly respected and sought after by journalism employers. The council currently offers a Level 3 Advanced Apprenticeship in Journalism enabling students to combine learning at sixth-form college or further education institutions with on-the-job training. It has been supported by media industry leaders for opening doors to a competitive industry for local young people as well as those who come from ethnic minority backgrounds.

SOURCES:
“Useful Sites” – Vijay Shah, The Half-Eaten Mind https://halfeatenmind.wordpress.com/useful-sites/
“Government accepts proposal to develop higher-level journalism apprenticeship” – National Council for the Training of Journalists (23 October 2014) http://www.nctj.com/latestnews/Governmentacceptsproposaltodevelophigher-leveljournalismapprenticeship
“Apprenticeships” – National Council for the Training of Journalists http://www.nctj.com/journalism-qualifications/apprenticeships
IMAGE CREDIT:
Getty Images via Zemanta.

PITMAN TRAINING: Vital Skills for Stratford Jobseekers

East London’s job hunters now have a new ally in the search for better career prospects. The Pitman Training Centre in Stratford is currently offering a two-day workshop for local jobseekers who are concerned that they are being held back by a lack of skills in jobsearching and employability.

Pitman Training are a nationwide training organisation offering courses in office-based careers. They specialise in secretarial skills, keyboard skills, accounts, information technology and provide specialised courses dealing with Microsoft packages. Pitman operate through convenient training locations and allow you to study at your own pace to gain certification. Not surprisingly, they have gained a foothold in east London, where much of the population are economically disadvantaged and both need and desire new skills to help them improve their situations.

(c) Pitman Training
The Berkeley Business Centre in Stratford, where Pitman’s workshops will be held (c) Free Office Finder

This special workshop will be held at the Berkeley Business Centre (not far from Stratford’s popular shopping district) and is designed with jobseekers in mind. If you live in the east London area especially, and are having trouble getting employers to notice your CV, or want to improve your current earnings, or even to acquire some helpful advice…then you could give the workshop a try.

Topics covered will include:

  • Selling yourself as an ideal candidate to prospective employers.
  • Writing the CV that gets noticed.
  • Finding jobs on the net i.e. online recruitment firms.
  • Interview techniques.
  • Self-development and adopting a ‘can-do’ attitude.
  • Using networking skills.
  • Utilising real-life and online social networks for career changes and advancement.
  • Making yourself more visible to recruiters.

Over the two days, you will receive guidance from experts in the field to tackle the increasingly tough job vacancy market. Although exact details of what will happen over the workshop’s duration are not available to the Half-Eaten Mind, it can be safely assumed that there will be presentations, group exercises and classroom teaching especially designed to help students hook that elusive vacancy.

When the UK job market is being pummelled by both the credit crunch and the Eurozone crisis, and as employers place more emphasis on IT and ‘soft’ skills, companies like Pitman Training will prove a valuable lifeline for those who are looking to get back into work or want to broaden their horizons.

To book a place at Pitman’s workshop in Stratford, you can call them direct on 0203 130 0778. Alternatively drop in for a quick chat at Pitman Training Centre Stratford, 2nd floor, Berkeley Business Centre, 44 Broadway, Stratford, London E15 1XH.

For more information – visit http://www.pitman-training.com/locations/pitman-training-stratford